Animaux | UK

Primavera Sound Review [2017]

Jun
24

From a personal perspective, Primavera turned into a prime example of times when you might enter a festival rattled up for particular artists and perhaps see a few that almost seem dispensable to the acts you’re eager to see. In an interesting twist of fate, these dispensable acts might just be the highlights of the night, or even, some of the most memorable shows you will ever witness. When was the last time you went to a concert and ended up watching a fully grown and talented man fashion his boxers as a g-string and set fire to his leg hair? What about seeing a 69-year-old performing while wearing a strap-on? What script could we have written that would have showcased any of this?

Aphex Twin

Thursday kicked off in jazzy hip-hop high-tops by BADBADNOTGOOD, and Kate Tempest – who through conveying complex emotions musically was example #1 of unexpectedly entrancing performances. Headlining the evening was Aphex Twin, with a set filled with drawn-out, aloof and prickly transitions that left many describing it for the rest of the weekend as “I’m not too sure what I just watched.” Things were turned down a notch with a theatrical-like show from Tycho, which looking back perfectly resembled vanilla – nice, pleasant, safe. Nothing to get too excited over.

Some sort of effort has kind of happened with Primavera’s stage layout, which results in most alternative/”mainstream” artists performing in the main body of Parc del Forum, with a long, constantly overcrowded bridge connecting this torso to a predominantly electronic music limb. Here, as #2-5 of unforeseen goodness, Fatima Yamaha gave a fittingly lofty and upbeat set, followed by a deliverance of subterranean levels of deep house by German producer/cult figurehead Henrik Schwarz and a truly chilling live set of breakbeat and broken vocal sample wading into moments of old school dubstep from Bicep to an enthusiastic and amicable crowd.

Mogwai

For many, Friday was from the very start not going to live up to the heightened expectations people had set themselves, considering that just the Sunday before, headliner Frank Ocean pulled out his performance as a result, the momentary trend of the festival “Prank Ocean” was born and available on t-shirts, bags and hats.

Regardless of this, the bill promised a rather organic affair of indie and alternative acts, starting with an impromptu show of smoke which somewhere amidst, Mogwai was playing. Mirroring recent albums, things were, once again, a bit vanilla – if anything, they were a perfect beginning for those just arriving and talking to each other while laying on one of the only grassy areas on site.

If anyone were to ask me what Primavera 2017 was like, seeing Mac DeMarco get halfway through “Together” before jumping onto a speaker, giving himself a thong and in the process the cameraman a good old view of his behind whilst carnally lowering himself towards the naked drummer and wincing when he caught himself burning his armpit hair would probably be the first thing that came back to mind. As someone who doesn’t take himself seriously, even as a musician, we, as spectators, were truly given a performance.

The contrast came heavy, then, when on the main stage of the festival, The xx somehow managed to give thousands of people a truly intimate and slightly sombre piece. I was someone who saw the debut album as a lover you never really got over and felt like everything that you experienced afterwards couldn’t compare to. Yet, a compelling interaction between singers Romy Madley Croft and Oliver Sim throughout playing, not to mention the iridescent personality of the group conveyed something that I’d never noticed before in the recent albums I’d so strongly stayed away from. In the vocal harmony alone lies a duet that is captivating and yet is almost obsolete in music today. It was clear that the trio had considered a wide range of elements for the set and combined a well-ordered set list with glistening visuals and faintly subdued lighting, which together exhibiting patterns of refracted light, left many in absolute awe. It was, in many ways, so precious, that it seems a shame to have to denote serious issues with sound, as was, in fact, to become a recurring theme throughout the weekend.

The xx

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, sound troubles continued on the Bowers & Wilkins stage, which considering is celebrated for its ingenuity in sound systems, it was almost agonising to listen to legendary force Âme play a live set through a crackling speaker. Despite this, it is impossible to characterise the tandem as anything other than a pure energy drive; it’s instantly clear why the duo has such a powerful reputation between them. This kind of vigour consequently feeds into its audience, which was spaciously formed of techno freaks and house heads.

Friday was signed off with panache by Flying Lotus, who has created himself as a type of cosmic jazz/contemporary electronic music alien. Exalting oomph in both a collision of musical genres and accompanying visuals (of which at one point starred a computerised human tied up on the floor, another feminine body with a face similar to FlyLo’s own twerking over) he unceasingly showed himself to say “no thanks” to conventional style, obscure and haunting one moment, hilarious and mocking the next. Talaboman, the duo outfit that is John Talabot and Axel Boman, moved light-dark/dark-light as the final act of the night when it starts to become morning. Stragglers of all stages transfixed to modern day landmarks of intelligent electronic music, a subjective climax peaking with the sunrise and moving to “The Sun Can’t Compare” in its full and entire glory.

Grace Jones

With a tendency to present older names and long-celebrated artists on Saturday, the atmosphere at Primavera is usually significantly different. The atmosphere gets a bit more relaxed, the crowd dies down and things become, or so it seems, a little more for the locals. The groove sets in earlier than previous days – this time in an oriental fusion with Junun, a project of different cultures and nationalities, usually including Jonny Greenwood. As a mixture of traditional Indian instruments and Israeli influences with electronic coding as the backbone of the outfit, Junun is a multi-cultural, polyrhythmic discourse; their performance giving colour and vitality and making it impossible to stay still. Later, diva/musical icon/Jamaican disco goddess Grace Jones created an absolute storm on the main stage, her entrance somewhat improvised after a dramatic and wind-induced curtain fall. Between bearing a force of a stage persona by asking for a “Coke” in an ambiguous manner midway through the set, to unveiling herself wearing a dildo, she showed herself to a society obsessed with youth and as limitless and unapologetically ageless.

John Talabot

In fact, Primavera proceeded to go down a Saturday Night Fever route in which disco proved to be king. Since Primavera is also an international phenomenon in both acts and audience, there is something intangibly special when John Talabot, who hails from Barcelona, comes back to his roots and performs in front of an appreciative and melody-hungry audience. Playing a disco set, Talabot continuously manages to capture this essence of bliss and yet take the whole of humankind on the same journey at the same time. Weval were a stones’ throw away making some similar magic – as a live and downbeat edition. The Dutch duo is a bit like how a priest might describe God – personal yet impersonal; transcendental yet immanent. Moving away slightly from the intricate power they’ve consistently mustered throughout their studio work, Weval led all eyes on an emotional thread and offered an all-encompassing performance that takes electro-pop, dreamy dance and touching vocals to finish in a state of rapture.

Regardless of the hushed-up malfunctioning sound system and the constant clashes of interest in the programme, reputations happen for a reason. Primavera is now recognised in international lands as a leading festival for its line-up, and this year, excluding the heartache of Prank Ocean, was no exception. An almost predictable outcome of this is a melting pot that allows attraction of like-minded people from a plethora of countries. Where other festivals might offer better food, boutiques and camping, few festivals can compete with the feeling of leaving in the early morning sun to head to the beach and walk back to base in the magical city with borderline mythological architecture and infinite springs of culture that is Barcelona.

Check out http://www.primaverasound.com/ for more info.

Animaux: Au Feu

Oct
07

Vous êtes tous des Animaux.

Very very excited (and nervous!) to announce that our next instalment will take place at the historic York’s FIRE STATION! This has been a dream since we saw the For Sale sign above the door for the fire engines. After gruelling negotiations with York’s council and the police, we were finally able to format an event that would make everyone happy.

We are investing heavily into the sound and light aspects of this, in order to truly transform the venue into something you will remember for a while – how many parties at a fire station have you been to? Add on great DJs, art pieces as well as visuals, a cheap bar and a place for those that want to chill and sit, a dance floor for those who don’t and you’ve got yourself an Animaux: Au Feu!

We are running the night in partnership with Blank Canvas, a Skippko.org project to find new and interesting venues in derelict buildings so that artists can practice, have workshops and galleries. Their motto is ‘To advance the education of the public in creative and visual arts and crafts and the techniques and practice thereof’ which we cannot support enough, thus are dedicating all of the profits towards their development. To accomplish this, we are collecting a tiny fee on the door (you are encouraged to donate more!) as well as a few donation boxes across the venue. We wouldn’t be able to do this without their support, so please give back – support the local art!

Cannot wait until you see what we have in store (or FIRE STATION)!

Event on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/298470707202068/

Until Friday,
– Animaux Team

Review: Farr Festival 2016

Jul
26

Farr festival, now in its eighth year, has grown considerably since its beginnings as a small party for friends. With a very affordable ticket price and many big names on the bill, a visit to Bygrave Woods this year was a must. I headed down with 5000 other dance music fans to check it out.

Thursday evening was a fairly quiet affair, with only three smaller stages open and music finishing at eleven. Nebraska played an enjoyable live set followed by Detroit Swindle who treated us to ‘Edit Channel XXX’ by JV, the early finish was a little disappointing but understandable for a Thursday.

Image Credit: Michael Njunge for Here & Now

Friday gave us a chance to check out the site in its entirety. Upon entering the arena you find food stalls and attractions (no sign of the dodgems that were advertised on social media) in a field just outside the woods. The woods are where Farr really comes to life. Five stages are dotted around the woodland and real attention has been put into the ramshackle decorations, it really is a wonderful setting for a festival.

Having got our bearings we headed over to the Hidden Palace for a varied set of chilled house such as Pepe Bradock’s ‘Deep Burnt’ along with some funkier stuff from Funkineven. Towards the end of his set he took to the the mic saying, “This is one of the best festivals I’ve played this year so far.” The crowd seemed to agree.

Image Credit: Michael Njunge for Here & Now

Having left to go to the bar I was told the stage was at capacity, this seemed odd to me as I had just been in there and there was plenty of room. After standing around for ten minutes, I found that the place was practically empty. I’m all for safety but this seemed to be overkill and was slightly ruining the atmosphere at the Hidden Palace.

The festival really got going with the brilliant decision for Joy Orbison, Ben UFO and Midland to play a 6-hour back-to-back set at the terrace. It was a great combination of styles and although I had intended to spend more time at other stages I just kept getting drawn back to them. I did drag myself away to see Move D, however, about an hour in, a power cut brought his set to an abrupt halt.

Upon returning to the terrace for the last few hours of the three-way b2b we did notice a serious lowering of volume levels. Fortunately tracks such as Four Tet’s Kool FM edit of ‘God Made Me Phunky’, Boddikas ‘Mercy VIP’ and Bizzare inc.’s 1992 hit ‘I’m Gonna Get You’ kept energy levels high. Hunee closed out the evening at The Shack, playing one of the wide-ranging sets he has become well known for, dropping Kiki Gyan ‘Disco Dancer’ a personal favourite of mine. With a great light show bouncing off the tree canopy above The Shack has a lovely feel to it and Hunee’s selection made for a quality conclusion to day one.

Image Credit: Michael Njunge for Here & Now

On Saturday having enjoyed sets from Maurice Fulton and Young Marco I would have loved to catch Gilles Peterson but due to the hidden palace being at capacity I was unable to. At ten we headed to The Shack for an excellent performance from Palms Trax dropping ‘Music Sounds Better With You’, which went down a storm. He then mixed that into ‘Women Beat Their Men’ by Submission it was a great transition and a standout moment of the weekend.

I was completely blown away by Helena Hauff who played two hours of relentless hard-hitting acid techno that went to show why she has become such a sought after booking these days. Again as the night wore on volume levels at all the stages were a real problem, I had to get really close to the speakers in order to avoid music bleeding in from other stages. As some of the stages are quite close together it may make more sense to reduce the number of stages and keep them further apart to avoid this.

For the final hours, I moved between Optimo and Mike Dunn and finally settling on John Talabot for the closing moments. Towards the end of his set he dropped Midland’s ‘Final Credits’ this was the fourth time I had heard that track over the course of the weekend. Finally bringing the festival to a close with ‘Everybody Dance’ was a nice touch and went down well with those of us still dancing.

Image Credit: Michael Njunge for Here & Now

Farr festival is great value with an intimate feel, however, more food stalls in the campsite would help sooth morning hunger and volume levels can be a little frustrating. These problems aside, the small number of attendees, delightful setting and well-curated line-up mean Farr is certainly one to keep on your radar.

Preview: Farr Festival 2016

May
26

On the 14th July, Farr Festival makes a greatly anticipated return to Bygrave Woods in Hertfordshire. The festival has always prided itself on being located just 40 minutes from London, and its handy location has proved popular with the fans it has amassed over its 7 years in the running. Although by no means a landmark UK festival, Farr has popped up on the radar of electronic music fans from across the country and really made a name for itself. The line-up for 2016 is stellar and makes Farr an unmissable festival this summer.

The likes of John Talabot, Palms Trax and Jungle all appear in the woods this July. Palms Trax’s recent appearance in York was one of the best bookings of the year for this historic city and so seeing the German producer play again at Farr would be an experience not to be wasted. Hunee also appears at Farr after his brief but memorable stint in Fibbers this year. Festival organisers have cannily booked pop outfit Jungle to give a light touch to the otherwise more underground scene of Farr’s line up.

(more…)

Love International Announces Line-up

Nov
03

After the original Croatian festival – The Garden Festival, closed its doors last year after a decade of parties it seemed as the yearly trek to the Adriatic sea was coming to the end for some. It seems that is not the case, however, as a spiritual successor is starting to shape up – Love International.

By day a harmonious holiday beneath the sizzling sun, and by dusk as the beats shift gear and introduce each balmy night beneath a canopy of stars, the intimate setting holds a unique energy, sound tracked by some of the world’s leading underground DJs and producers, drawing a vibrant and diverse audience from across the world to this tiny strip of paradise.

Dave Harvey, one of Love International’s founders, explains that: “We are feeling really great about Love International and continuing the great work The Garden Festival family created here over the last ten years. What we are doing is going to have its own vibe and some new elements, but at the same time we are seeking to retain and embrace what made The Garden so good – that family feel to it all, everyone knowing everyone else, all set in this incredible site on the coast. For us it’s about continuing that growth in our own way, so people who came to The Garden will find Love International familiar to them, but at the same time it will be a new experience. We feel we have got some great names onboard for our first announcement, with loads more to come in January.”

Love International First Line Up

Many more names will be announced in the New Year, along with boat and club parties and exciting new elements to Love International.

***

Love International
Weds 29th June – Weds 6th July 2016
@ The Garden Tisno, Petrica Glava 34, 22240, Tisno, Croatia
Lineup so far: Dixon, MCDE, Ben UFO, Gerd Janson, Craig Richards, Joy Orbison, Midland, Horse Meat Disco, Prosumer, Hunee, Tama Sumo, Job Jobse, Fort Romeau, Felix Dickinson, Red Axes, Lord Of The Isles, Khruangbin and many more to be announced
£120 for 7 days and 7 nights (club and boat parties extra) www.loveinternationalfestival.com

Animaux: Apéritif LIVE Now!

Sep
12

Vous êtes tous des Animaux.

Apéritif is aimed to provide an intimate setting, where you can kick back, listen to some quality music and taste some amazing cocktails

This week its Endeser all night long! We start at 9 and finish late.

Enjoy!

Preview: Dekmantel Festival 2015

Jul
09

This will be the third, ongoing year of the young festival of electronic music, hosted in the Dutch capital of Amsterdam. From the opening concert on the 30th of July to the last beat of the closing act in the early hours of August 2nd, Dekmantel will vibrate all the way throughout the capital with its new improved and expanded layout; and I sure as hell can’t wait to be shaken by it.

For the past two years Amsterdamse Bos (Amsterdam Forest) has been the main and only location of the festival. The 1,000 hectares of the entirely artificial landscape park –that is three times the size of Central Park if you need a comparison are located just outside of the city on the borders of Amstelveen. Although artificially created, don’t expect to see fake trees and little ponds. The site is a host of immense natural beauty and amongst other things you can expect to see lush forests, grassy meadows and large water areas including lakes and rivers. It is also a host of a variety of animals but I doubt you’ll get to see any before they are chased away by the boisterous vibes. De Heuvel (The Hill), is one thing you shouldn’t miss; an artificial mountain turned massive slippery slope in winter for kids to enjoy winter sports on. But who says you can’t use it for your regular adrenaline rush tumble? And if you want to fully embrace nature in all its glory there’s even a ‘Naturalist area’ where you can ‘kick your clothes off’ and relax. This year, the space will host five stages (MAIN, UFO, THE LAB, SELECTORS, BOILER ROOM) and not only will you have the chance to experience all of the above, but also another two additional venues!

Treating the opening concert (30th July) as a proper concert, the team have decided to host it in the concert hall for contemporary classical music, Muziekgebouw aan’t IJ (Music Building on the IJ). The building features two massive venues -one for music, one for theatre- and is located above the IJ tunnel by the waterfront, just a 10 minute walk from Centraal Station.

The second, newly adopted venue for the night programme is one of significant importance to the Danish electronic music scene. Former dairy factory, the Melkweg (Milky Way) has been the city’s most well-known electronic music venue ever since its renovation and re-opening in 1970. Located in the nightlife hotspot of Leidseplein, the venue features a number of multi-purpose rooms including two on the ground floor with ridiculous capacities (Max: 1,500 and Oude Zaal: 700) which will most likely be used for the purposes of the festival.

The Dekmantel team lives by the ethos they started with: quality over quantity. The music scene is grand and there really is something for every taste.

I for one can’t wait for some of the big names that will hit the stages of Amsterdamse Bog. The king of the infamous Berghain in Berlin, as well as producer and label owner, Ben Klock, will be gracing us with his presence, followed by the equally influential techno master Marcel Dettmann. Both will play on the Friday evening as a perfect reminder of what is to follow in the next couple of days. Two of the biggest American names in techno, Carl Craig, Detroit master and experimentalist and Jeff Mills with his relentlessly hard and industrial sounds are certainly going to grant some life-changing dance floor experiences I do not want to miss. One of my personal favourites, Nina Kraviz, will be one of the last to share her unique blend of acid house and techno with the festival crowds on Sunday at the UFO stage, clashing with the deep beats of Dixon from the Main stage –it’s going to be a hard choice. Incorporating more styles into his techno beats than anyone, from hip-hop to jazz, grime and live instrumentation, our very own U.K. artist Four Tet will also be gracing the Main stage and is certainly someone I never tire of seeing. Certainly, there are more names that strike a chord and a lot more genres for you to look out for. Squarepusher will be bringing us some drum & bass, musique concrete and acidic beats with jazz influences, Ricardo Villalobos his mad dance beats, Madlib his hip-hop influenced sounds and Siriusmodeselektor will give us the opportunity to feel his mad bass live. And if you need a break from all the electronic music just for a little while, Roy Ayers will be there to chill you out with his funk, soul and jazz.

Last but not least, I have to mention the treats the team has lined up for our evening entertainment in the Melkweg. Again, I just have to praise one of the headlines as I am monstrously excited to see this guy. After his recent release ‘Faith in Strangers’, Manchester dub and techno producer Andy Stott will be playing a live set. Another highlight will certainly have to be watching the U.K. father of disco/garage/house, DJ Harvey, mix another one of his incredibly varied sets. Moreover, two artists will be returning to the Dekmantel stage after their successful sets last year: the granddad of U.K. techno Surgeon and U.S. experimental house boss Traxx. Once again, there will be something for every taste. Answer Code Request will be bringing the industrial punch and fierce determination, Basic Soul Unit the deep house, Boris Werner the house and others a lot more.

My expectations are big, but my excitement is bigger. I know I’m not missing this for the world… why should you?

Why you should go to Gottwood Festival

Jun
19

“I definitely got a feeling of an underground vibe at Gottwood. Not only because of the limited tickets; as far as I know it grew naturally year after year. You get a different kind of spirit that way. It draws sensitive people who want to enjoy and experience something that is unusual, in an unusual space”Margaret Dygas.

Late Thursday evening, after rolling over yet another hill in Wales, we finally reached the Gottwood site. We were greeted by what looked like a 90’s rave scene – a seemingly random field, crowded with an assortment of cars, in the middle of nowhere.

Gottwood001

After a quick tent pitch-up we headed down the hill towards the main site. We entered through an imposing gate with the Gottwood logo proudly blazing on top. The thing that immediately struck me was the amount of art that was around – from the little shops selling everything from the usual festival attire, jewellery or henna and massages; to pieces of art, some of which was still being worked on (and continued being worked on throughout the weekend!) It was hard to wrap my head around the care and attention that had gone into preparing this festival site – did I mention an outdoor cinema shaped as a gigantic TV?

While we were ogling the weird sculptures and enjoying the swings, I couldn’t help but notice the bass thumping away in the distance… the Forest stage. A huge arena surrounded by massive hay bales, a few of them tossed in the middle for people to dance on. We were lucky enough to visit this stage just as Artwork started his set – probably the best way to be greeted at any festival. As we danced the night away under the trees, to a fantastic mix of newer and also older house rhythms, the stage gave one last surprise to close the first night off – a large array of CO2 cannons that went off in time to the beat of the music, to cool off the crowd, and to show everyone that the party was just beginning.

Gottwood016

The next day, after a quick recovery coffee (yep, in the middle of a field in Wales, there was actually more than one place to get coffee), we headed towards what was most definitely our icon of Gottwood – the stage by the lake. We were greeted by the Lawn stage – THE place to be during the day due to the absolutely perfect daytime grooves provided by a variety of DJs, selectors and bands (The Mouse Outfit were particularly memorable here). The music gracefully swayed from the usual offenders such as house and disco to hip-hop (live!) and towards the more abstract ambient (Ruf Dug is my new fave), always accompanied with a varied group of enthusiastic dancers in majestic attire, keeping with this years ‘gazzy’ theme.

The Caravan stage was stationed directly opposite the Lawn, which played host to great artists such as Midland, Leon Vynehall and Soul Clap (among others). This seemed to be the place for me at least for the first night, sadly the weekend did not pan out this way. At the very start of Leon Vynehall’s set, a speaker blew and despite the best efforts of the sound engineers, it never really sounded great there. Which was a shame but by no means detrimental to the festival as a whole, this then lead us to explore the rest of the place a bit more and oh, did it deliver.

A brisk walk from the Caravan stage and over a little bridge we went, to be welcomed by a small queue next to a weirdly shaped tent. We did not have a map of the site at this point and as our interest was piqued, we headed in to what we would later discover to be the LZRDM. I have been surprised by many things when entering weirdly shaped tents (some good, some… interesting…) and I can assure you that I was not expecting this. It was a completely pitch-black room, with only a handful of razor-edged lasers cutting the sweaty air. A few strobe lights would flash to show a full room of dancers in complete euphoric awe, same as we were – a truly remarkable experience.

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After a little shimmy to the LZRDM resident’s set, we finally managed to find an exit (not that easy as when it’s pitch black), we headed towards the Trawler stage. Settled on a little hill on the shore directly across the lake from the Lawn, this was a night-time stage which housed (heh…) some of the very best at Gottwood; Margaret Dygas, Zip, WOLF Music and Move D, all graced the stage here with incredible performances left, right and centre with an amazing backdrop just behind (pictured below).

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After getting a little peckish, we headed to the main food area, overlooked by the Mother Owl stage. The food at Gottwood in itself deserves a mention – everything we had the pleasure of trying was fantastic; the quality, quantity and the price was always on point. The variety was huge too – from the usual pizzas and burgers (My Mate’s Barbecue requires a special shout!) to toasties, mac n cheese and a vast selection of different asian cuisines. Aforementioned Mother Owl always sported a smaller, yet seemingly always smiling crowd, which was grooved by the likes of Romare and my favourite there, Luv*Jam. Next year, I hope he gets a later slot time as he absolutely killed it. While having an enormous grin on his face. Oh and I just might start training in hula-hooping!

Gottwood044

The Barn – the bass bunker that hosted the likes of Om Unit, dBridge and 2 Bad Mice, also requires a special mention! I couldn’t shake a feeling of being at Beaver Works (Leeds) while in there with the smell of beer and sweat mixing together while everyone was jumping around to a mix of bass and grime throughout the weekend.

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And last (but definitely not least) – the Walled Garden. This was my favorite stage and it was a short walk from the main food area. After squeezing through the tiny passageway through a wall (thus the name), we entered a large stretch with its own bar and a massive tent which housed the artists and the crowd. Gottwood would not be Gottwood if it wasn’t for the little touches – a few small clouds were dotted around just underneath the tent.

Night after night, I was drawn back to the stage to see tINI, Zenker Brothers (!!) and the highlight of the festival for me Ben UFO b2b Craig Richards – a marathon 6 hour madness. FaltyDL was also scheduled to play. Alas, he did not make an appearance, however Zenker Brothers took over and truly delivered.

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A few other special mentions regarding the artists – a discovery for me, yet someone who I will try to see as much as I can from now on – Hunnee did a phenomenal job mixing absolutely ALL genres AND making it work. Weaving disco straight into 90’s rave and back to slower house grooves, while maintaining his explosive dance moves, was truly a spectacle. A shout to Motor City Drum Ensemble too, who closed the festival and was critical of himself as always. “I’m sorry; I’m feeling a bit shaky” – said in a strong German accent, even though he absolutely smashed it.

Honestly, I was not expecting Gottwood to be such a marvellous experience. I have heard time and time again about it, but only now do I understand. You can see the love, sweat and tears that has gone into building it through the years and how it has grown – the little touches speak for themselves. With no plans to expand as they are happy with the Gottwood family they have created (every festival band is proudly engraved with “You are part of the Gottwood family”), I am thrilled to be a part of it and I urge everyone to join. A truly magical place, in a magical forest filled with magical people. Something that I overheard and wholeheartedly agree with – “Gottwood is a place best friends go to, to make more best friends”. See you there next year, friends.

Don’t forget to check out our gallery for more pictures!

 

Shit Robot – We Got A Love

Mar
21

Shit Robot may have just converted me to disco. The Irishman who spent time both across the pond in New York and slightly closer to home in Germany is back with his second album We Got A Love. In a time when many argue music is becoming oversaturated will his latest work be able to make a splash? I bloody hope so.

I popped on Shit Robot’s (a.k.a. Marcus Lambkin) album with low expectations but an aim to be civil. Instead what came through the speakers is a solid and truly enjoyable album that I had to turn the volume up to. It may not be innovative, but that is exactly why these songs are so robust. Lambkin knows exactly what he is doing, and with no new concepts tentatively experimented with the result is an album full of bangers. Classic disco and house vibes mean We Got A Love is going to get you moving. Appropriate listening equipment includes good speakers and plenty of room to dance. As a result it’s not suitable for all occasions. But did Shit Robot make this album for all occasions? Hell no. This album is inspired by and made for those dark sweaty clubs where the girls ditched heels for sneakers and twerking for two-stepping. Though I wouldn’t let that stop you playing it whenever you get the chance.

The highlights of the album for me have got to be the closing song Tempest, with its raw power and lively drums demanding your attention and the second single off the album Do That Dance where the ever cool Nancy Whang tells us to “get down with the right attitude”. With little prompting I followed Whang’s request and thus, once a disco hater, I am now a lover.

I know as summer rolls in I am about to hear a lot more of Shit Robot on the clubbing scene, and I can’t wait.